Tag Archives: musicbrainz

New MusicBrainz Virtual Machine released

We’ve finally released a new MusicBrainz virtual machine! This new version has become a lot more automated and is much easier to create and deploy. Hopefully we will be doing monthly releases of the VM from here on out.

lot of things have changed for this new release. If you have used the VM before, you MUST read the instructions again. Before filing a bug or asking us a question, please re-read the documentation first!

Ready to jump in? Read the instructions.

Final sprint towards NewHost

So tomorrow is the day when the old servers at Digital West will be put to rest. Our developers and system administrator have been hard at work over the last few weeks (and especially the last few days!) getting everything ready for a hopefully smooth transition to hosting everything at Hetzner in Germany.

The vast majority of our sites and services are in fact already being served from Germany, but the largest one—musicbrainz.org—remains in the US for another night.

Our transition of the final services, such as musicbrainz.org, has already started, but the very last sprint of moving the remaining bits over will start tomorrow, November 8th, at around 6 AM EST / noon UTC / 13:00 CET and will follow the plan laid out in this Google document:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MgqZ4hiKC0MZJ400ZCOD8JlcjBjh4GNpakauf51YKQQ/edit?usp=sharing

Expect some downtime, plenty of read-only time, and general wonkiness as we get the last gears set in place to hopefully keep us running smoothly for the next several years to come!

New MusicBrainz test VM available

There is a new test VM available for anyone who would like to try the latest, possibly not fully debugged, VM. I’m not sure why the VM is nearly 20GB larger than the previous one, while containing roughly the same stuff, but that is what we’re stuck with for this test. I’ll try harder to minimize the size for the final build.

Grab the VM here.

Read these Usage tips.

IMPORTANT: Please ignore the usage tips published on the wiki — they do not apply to this release. For the next release I’ll try and match more of the characteristics of the last version. Do read the usage tips above!

File a bug here.

We’re actually really going to take the HTTPS plunge!

Closing in on three years after stating that “We’re going to take the HTTPS plunge!”, we’re actually really going to do it now. 🙂

Most of our sites have forced HTTPS for some time (metabrainz.org, critiquebrainz.org, bookbrainz.org, listenbrainz.org), but there are still a couple of stragglers, notably musicbrainz.org and acousticbrainz.org.

For MusicBrainz, our beta site is now all HTTPS, web service and all. The main, non-beta musicbrainz.org will be going HTTPS-only except for what’s under /ws/ (ie., the web service) to allow taggers and other programs not currently using HTTPS some transition time. We do not currently have an ETA for when we will make the final jump to HTTPS-only on the MusicBrainz web service, as that partly depends on feedback from our web service users, which leads me to:

If you’re currently using the MusicBrainz web service, please try and switch your program to using beta.musicbrainz.org and see whether your program breaks or not and let us know the status of it. We are aware that some Python versions and MusicBrainz libraries do not support our setup, so while your program may fail now, it might simply be because of dependencies of your program not being updated yet and you might not need to do anything specifically on your end – however, some programs/libraries might need some updates, so the more people test and report back, the better we’ll be able to judge when we can go all-HTTPS-only on musicbrainz.org.

For AcousticBrainz, we now have a shiny new Let’s Encrypt certificate on https://acousticbrainz.org thanks to our systems administrator Zas! As a result, we are going to start redirecting all HTTP traffic to HTTPS on the AcousticBrainz website, including API queries.

In order to give everyone time to verify that their scripts correctly recognise and validate our Let’s Encrypt certificate, we are going to delay the redirect until July 1, 2016. On this date, any HTTP query will automatically be redirected to HTTPS. We will also enable HSTS, so that compliant browsers will redirect to HTTPS on the client-side.

If you have any questions about either the MusicBrainz or the AcousticBrainz transition, please ask.

Temporary autoeditor election procedure

Hello people,

In former days, new autoeditor elections were announced on the autoeditor mailing list that all autoeditors were automatically subscribed to. However, all our mailing lists, including the autoeditor one, died in September 2015 when the server they were hosted on took its last breath. This effectively halted the election of new autoeditors. It was always the plan that our new forums should be able to handle this, but our recent issues have meant development on the features necessary to completely replace the autoeditor mailing list has been slow. Thus Nicolás (reosarevok) and I had a talk about how to handle elections going forward, and we came up with this procedure:

  1. The proposer nominates the editor normally (starting an election), and then adds a post in the Autoeditors category of the forum linking to the election and asking for seconders. Like with the mailing list, this should also contain the proposer’s reasoning for proposing the candidate.
  2. Nicolás (reosarevok) will then mail out to all autoeditors with a link to the election topic (and possibly a link to this blog post).
  3. The proposer, Nicolás or me (or another autoeditor, if they’re faster) will update the thread once a 2nd seconder is found and the voting has started, and again when the voting has ended and the results are in.

We have added most autoeditors who are already signed up on the new forums to the @MB_Autoeditors group, but not all autoeditors have signed in to Discourse yet, and some have spaces or other “weird” characters in their username that make Discourse not able to parse them. If you find that you’re not in the @MB_Autoeditors group and you think you should be, please write a message to me (Freso) or Nicolás (reosarevok) via MusicBrainz and ask us to add you to the group. (Sending your message via MusicBrainz will let us know that it is indeed you/your account, so please don’t poke us on IRC or elsewhere about it.)

This is all obviously intended to be temporary, just until we’re able to get the process fully automated again. If you have any Ruby experience/know-how and would like to help out, please check out OTHER-248 (and possibly OTHER-254). There’s also MBS-8836 on the MusicBrainz server side for the Perl-istas.

Let us know if you have any concerns or questions about this (reminder: temporary) approach, either in the comments or on the forums. I personally hope it’ll work well enough to carry us through for a while longer until everything is ready.

Wrapping up Google Code-in 2015

The Google Code-in Google Code‐in is pretty much over for this time, and we’ve had a blast in our first year with the competition in MetaBrainz with a total of 116 students completing tasks. In the end we had to pick five finalists from these, and two of these as our grand prize winners getting a trip to the Googleplex in June. It was a really, really tough decision, as we have had an amazing roster of students for our first year. In the end we picked Ohm Patel (US) and Caroline Gschwend (US) as our grand prize winners, closely followed by Stanisław Szcześniak (Poland), Divya Prakash Mittal (India), and Nurul Ariessa Norramli (Malaysia). Congratulations and thank you to all of you, as well as all our other students! We’ve been very excited to work with you and look forwards to seeing you again before, during, and after coming Google Code-ins as well! 🙂

Rayna Kanapuram MusicBrainz presentation

Indian student Rayne presenting MusicBrainz to her classmates.

In all we had 275 tasks completed during the Google Code-in. These tasks were divided among the various MetaBrainz projects as well as a few for beets. We ended up having 29 tasks done for BookBrainz, 124(!) tasks for CritiqueBrainz, 95 tasks for MusicBrainz, 1 task for Cover Art Archive, 6 tasks for MusicBrainz Picard, 3 tasks for beets, and 17 generic or MetaBrainz related tasks.

Some examples of the tasks that were done include:

Ariessa MetaBrainz infographic

Finalist Nurul Ariessa Norramli’s MetaBrainz infographic.

In all, I’m really darn happy with the outcome of this Google Code-in and how some of our finalists continue to be active on IRC and help out. Stanisław is continuing work on BookBrainz, including having started writing a Python library for BB’s API/web service, and Caroline is currently working on a new icon set for the MusicBrainz.org redesign that can currently be seen at beta.MusicBrainz.org.

Again, congratulations to our winners and finalists, and THANK YOU! to all of the students having worked on tasks for MetaBrainz. It’s really been an amazing ride and we’re definitely looking forward to our next foray into Google Code-in!

Notifications and messaging in MetaBrainz projects

During the last MusicBrainz summit in Barcelona we decided to start working on finding possible ways to implement two features that have been requested for a long time:

  1. Messaging between users
  2. Notifications about various actions in MetaBrainz projects

Since MetaBrainz is more than just MusicBrainz these days, we also want to integrate these features into other projects. That, for example, means when a user is reading reviews on CritiqueBrainz they can see notifications about comments on their edits on MusicBrainz. Same applies to messaging. These features are intended to encourage our communities to communicate more easily with each other.

Messaging

http://tickets.musicbrainz.org/browse/MBS-8721

The only ways of communication we have right now are two IRC channels, forums that we plan to replace with Discourse, and comments on individual edits. Sometimes we end up sending private emails to editors for one reason or another. Perhaps it is better to have our own messaging system for this purpose? I imagine it being similar to messaging systems on forums, reddit, etc. We would like to know what you think potential uses are for this and how it might look like to be useful.

Notifications

http://tickets.musicbrainz.org/browse/MBS-1801

Site-based notifications are another thing that people have been asking for a long time. For example, these notifications can be related to edits on MusicBrainz, reviews on CritiqueBrainz, datasets in AcousticBrainz, etc. It can be an addition or replacement for email notifications that we currently have in MusicBrainz. Maybe something similar to the inbox feature that the Stack Exchange network has. People should be able to choose if they want to keep receiving email notifications or only use the new site-based notifications.

Progress so far

We looked at a couple of ways to implement this functionality.

First suggestion was to use the Layer toolkit. The problem with it is that we don’t want to be dependent on closed software and another company’s infrastructure, especially in case of such important features.

Second was to use the XMPP protocol to handle communication and notifications. We tried to implement a proof of concept using this protocol and encountered several issues at the start:

  • It’s unclear how to store messages and process them later;
  • It can be problematic to reuse the same connection in different browser;
  • There are plenty of things that we’ll need to implement on top of this protocol ourselves (like authentication, storage, notifications).

Repository with everything that was implemented so far is at https://github.com/metabrainz/xmpp-messaging-server. Given these problems we started considering implementing our own server(s) for this purpose.

You can take a look at the document where we collect most information about current progress.

Feedback

There’s plenty of feedback on the site-based notifications feature request, and we have a pretty good understanding of what’s needed. This is not the case with the messaging feature. We explored several options for implementing this kind of functionality and decided that it’s time to refresh the list of requirements to get an idea of what needs to be done.

The goal of this blog post is to encourage discussion and gather ideas. If you are interested in these features, please share your thoughts and suggestions.