Tag Archives: team

Expanding our team

As the world comes back to life after the summer break, we’re making some changes and expanding our team. First, Roman Tsukanov has decided to not renew his contract with us. During his tenure with MetaBrainz, Roman adopted and released CritiqueBrainz and also wrote our new MetaBrainz web page, which is helping us bring in new supporters. His contributions have been far from trivial — thank you for your efforts, Roman!

Due in part to the new MetaBrainz web site, we’ve got more financial support than ever, and this allows us to replace Roman with two engineers! I’m please to announce that we’re hiring two of our Summer of Code students who just completed the program:

Sambhav Kothari AKA samj1912: Sambhav started hacking on Picard earlier this year and knocked Picard out of dormancy, working towards a new release and then making Picard his Summer of Code project. He completed his project with flying colors and is working towards a major upgrade of Picard. On the MetaBrainz team he is going to look after the new search infrastructure and the maintenance and bug fixing of our Web Service in addition to hacking on Picard. A full plate, for sure!

Param Singh AKA iliekcomputers: About the same time that samj1912 arrived, Param arrived. He expressed interest in working on ListenBrainz — he too dove right in and started making improvements. ListenBrainz had quite a ways to go before he could aim to make a Summer of Code project out of it. Param and I embarked on a journey to revamp and improve the stability of ListenBrainz, which culminated in us releasing the new ListenBrainz beta a few weeks ago. Since then he’s been focusing on his Summer of Code project, which is also now complete. On the MetaBrainz team Param will be looking after ListenBrainz and also the new MetaBrainz web site.

Both Param and Sambhav will officially start working on the MetaBrainz team starting October 1, but I strongly suspect we’ll see them around and hacking on the projects as has become the norm this year.

Welcome aboard Sambhav and Param!

 

We’ve hired another MusicBrainz developer!

I’m pleased to announce that Yvan Rivierre has joined the MusicBrainz development team! Yvan is not new to our community — he has been participating MusicBrainz development for some time and more recently has been attending our weekly community meeting. He’s submitted several pull requests to MusicBrainz already, and now he joins us as a full time developer.

Yvan’s nickname on all things MetaBrainz is now yvanzo, was formerly yvanz, in case you’re wondering what happened. Expect him to be around even more, helping bitmap to make improvements and changes to MusicBrainz. The MusicBrainz search infrastructure and hosting are no longer core tasks for the MusicBrainz team, leaving yvanzo and bitmap to focus solely on MusicBrainz. This brings us to a new level of dedication to our most important project and should allow us to tackle more issues faster focus new areas of improvement. (e.g. hopefully we can start making improvements in UX/UI this year!)

Welcome aboard Yvan!

Welcome to the team Elizabeth!

I’m very happy to announce that we have a brand new Supporter Catalyst on our team. Elizabeth Bigger, AKA Quesito, joined our team at the beginning of the year and is now coming up to speed.

Her duties include making contact with any supporters who sign up on the MetaBrainz site and to sort out any questions they may have working with such a quirky organization like MetaBrainz. She’ll also be reaching out to established customers to make sure that they are on the right support level and that things are working smoothly for our supporters.

I anticipate her also helping out with other tasks such as putting on our annual summit and other events we may hold in our office in Barcelona.

Welcome on board, Elizabeth!

A positive outlook going forward

My next installment of MusicBrainz management changes focuses on how we should frame our discussions going forward. Currently there is a lot of animosity in our community and a lot of finger pointing — neither of these are constructive for moving forward, so I will aim to cut these short and focus on fixing rather than blaming.

I’d like to offer an analogy to start this discussion: When two people are in a personal relationship and when that relationship starts falling apart, a lot of negative feelings come up. The two people will often blame each other and be convinced that the other person is the reason for all of their troubles. If you’ve ever had an opportunity to talk to two people in a failing relationship, you’ll probably have seen that failing relationships are usually the fault of both people. I’ve yet to find a relationship that failed, solely on the actions of one person alone. Both people are involved, both people had a hand in it.

That said, I’ll step forward and say it: I am guilty. I am partially to blame for what is going on. Go ahead, feel free to blame me for the troubles we’re facing.

But, that is it. Basta! We’re not going to engage in finding every little thing that was done wrong, by whom and work hard to lay blame. That is pointless and it brings up unnecessary emotions. Instead of finding blame we’re going to find problems to our solutions and we’re going to move forward.

As part of me restructuring MusicBrainz, I’m going to be asking everyone what problems they perceive with the project right now. I will listen to the problems, catalog them and attempt to build a plan for tackling these problems in the future. However, I will insist that problems are stated without aggressive communication (e.g. passive aggressive communication) and without value judgements. If you cannot state your issue without being aggressive or disrespectful, you can count on me calling you on your behaviour. I will not address problems that are stated in an aggressive or disrespectful manner.

For instance, it is not acceptable to say: “I don’t think that anyone is going to listen to me anyway, but I think that because of Joe’s idiotic decision to not allow white space in code, all of our code is a freaking mess — this was the worst idea ever!” This statement has passive aggressive communication, it lays blame and contains a value judgement. One way to express the same concern in a constructive manner could be: “The decision to exclude whitespace from our code has created a number of difficulties for people to follow our code. We should re-consider this decision.”

This means of expressing problems, ideas and solutions allows us to focus our energy on moving forward and improving the project. It avoids painful discussions that won’t gives us much insight on moving forward. As we work to mend our community, I will be relying on these communication tools heavily. If you run afoul of these new communication guidelines, expect me to remind of you of this blog post. 🙂

Team change

Ian (ianmcorvidae), our senior developer on the MusicBrainz project, has decided to leave the project due to personal reasons. I’m sad to see a very skilled engineer leave our team — Ian has done a tremendous amount of great work for MusicBrainz and the MetaBrainz hosting infrastructure. Thank you for all of your hard for in the past few years, Ian!

Ian will remain on our team while he seeks a new professional position, so the change won’t be immediate. That said, now is the time to ask Ian to document whatever pieces of his work that still need documentation.

If anyone knows an experienced perl developer with experience using web technologies, Postgres and the myriad of technologies that MusicBrainz uses, please let us know! I’ll be posting an official job posting next week.