Classical Clean Up #3: Dvořák

Your favourite time of the year is at hand! No, I don’t mean Christmas, I (obviously) mean the Classical Community Clean Up. Debussy went very well, Mahler was fantastic, and it’s time for a third! Come join us in paying a little special attention to classical masters!

This time around the community has chosen (probably) the world’s only composer who is also a keyboard layout, the titan of Czech music Antonín Dvořák. We encourage you during this time to not only help the community clean up Dvořák’s metadata, but to learn more about Dvořák as well.

The clean up events officially last one month (but can be continued until they’re complete!) and are meant to utilize our community’s power to clean up our classical metadata. If you are new to MusicBrainz, to classical editing, or both, we have a whole tool box and plenty of advice, tips and tricks to share. We advise you bookmark the tool box—it’s quite helpful! Our team of classical music enthusiasts will also provide plenty of support on our forums, so come join us!

What we will work on:

  • Reviewing the existing works to make sure there are no duplicates and the information looks correct, and add any missing works (keep in mind while it is perfectly ok to add lost works, it’d be good to specify they’re lost so that people don’t accidentally use them on recordings).
  • Check the release list for anything that doesn’t follow the classical guidelines. Not only that should be fixed, but that’s a good sign of the recording and relationship info being incomplete too.
  • Check the recording list. The only recordings that should be here by the end of the cleanup are of Dvořák himself as a performer (probably none, and in any case very few). Anything else being here should have performer relationships added to it if missing, then the artist credits for the recording should be changed to list the main performers (you can use the relevant script for that). Try to fix the whole release the recording is on, even if it’s not all by Dvořák! But in the case of a very large compilation, it’s always acceptable to fix only the Dvořák content on it.
  • Add missing Dvořák recordings! If you have enough info to add a Dvořák release we’re missing, that’s always useful. Just make sure to try to add as much info as possible from the get go, so we don’t have to clean that addition up as well. 🙂

We recently had 2995 recordings, 781 works and 862 releases under Dvořák, and we’re expecting to have many fewer wrongly listed recordings and many more Dvořák releases by the end of the month. Don’t know where to begin? Join us and ask, let us help you find a jumping in point! Here’s to another great month of Classical Clean Up with Dvořák!

By the way, you can get the above poster and a wallpaper version courtesy of Chhavi, in case you feel like having Dvořák himself staring at you will motivate you further! 😉

Classical Clean Up #2: Mahler. The Conclusions!

As we published at the start of October, during the last month we’ve been trying to clean up our data for Gustav Mahler. October is over now, and you might be wondering how that went. Well, no need to wonder anymore, because our users have made a fantastic job not just of cleaning Mahler’s data up, but of showing us how clean it is!

Our editor stupidname took statistical snaps at the start, the midpoint and the end of the project:

Oct 1st Oct 18th Nov 2nd
Recordings 2361 66 (-2295) 11 (-2350)
Tracks 11866 14094 (+2228) 15228 (+3362)
Releases 924 1192 (+268) 1363 (+439)
Release Groups 720 871 (+151) 986 (+266)

As we can see, the existing recordings where mostly cleaned up 18 days in, but a lot of new releases kept being added up until the end of the month.

Additionally, stupidname also checked the amount of recordings for some of the main works by Mahler to see the changes over time (specifically, due to the way our works… err.. work, the data is for one movement of each work rather than the main work itself):

Oct 1st Oct 18th Nov 2nd
Symphony no. 1 95 115 (+20) 120 (+25)
Symphony no. 2 114 145 (+31) 149 (+35)
Symphony no. 3 108 141 (+33) 144 (+36)
Symphony no. 4 68 82 (+14) 85 (+17)
Symphony no. 5 92 93 (+1) 98 (+6)
Symphony no. 6 65 74 (+9) 87 (+11)
Symphony no. 7 76 86 (+10) 96 (+20)
Symphony no. 8 89 108 (+19) 106 (+17)
Symphony no. 9 125 141 (+16) 176 (+51)
Das Lied von der Erde 47 53 (+6) 55 (+8)
Kindertotenlieder 41 52 (+11) 62 (+21)
Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen 54 63 (+9) 68 (+14)

This data is a bit less precise, because some of these recordings are partial (and the specific organization of Symphony no. 8 makes it especially tricky to count), but it is still a very nice view of how we’ve gotten extra recordings of basically everything!

Our editor loujin made graphs with the amount of edits per editor during the cleanup. There are too many editors for the legend to show them all, but the graph shows that the two biggest contributors by far were ListMyCDs.com (green) and stupidname (light blue), with a bunch of other editors making several hundred edits as well.

And finally, also thanks to loujin, you can see how the cleanup affected the amount of edits done on Mahler (no prizes for guessing which bar it is!):

Thanks to all this hard work, our entry on Mahler should be a particularly good example of the amount and quality of classical data you can get from MusicBrainz, and an inspiration for other composer pages! Thanks so much to everyone, and we’ll be back with more in December!

Mahler is impressed

MetaBrainz Summit 17

While the streets of Barcelona were filling up with the referendum conundrum, a bunch of people were spotted chattering and bantering, sometimes with pillows and colorful socks, searching for gelato.

Yes, that bunch of people would be us. 😀

Our annual MusicBrainz summit was held on September 30th–October 1st in the colorful, lively city of Barcelona. We had people (and chocolates) from nine countries: Spain, India, Germany, UK, USA, France, Estonia, Denmark, and Iceland.

Summit participants with *Brainz pillows

From left→right, top: Wieland (Mineo), Sambhav (samj1912), Sean (Leftmost Cat), Nicolás (reosarevok), Ben (LordSputnik), Jérôme (loujin), Alastair (alastairp); middle: Leo Verto, Freso, Michael (bitmap), Elizabeth (Quesito), Chhavi; bottom: Yvan (yvanzo), Rob (ruaok), Param (iliekcomputers), Suyash (ferbncode). Laurent (zas) behind the camera.


Having a majority of our team in a room with food obviously lead to lots of productive discussions. We talked about translations, recommendations engines, voting, and packaging. We also talked about SpamBrainz, user scripts being included as part of our projects, documentation, single sign-on for all Brainz, and a bunch of other things.

One of the nice things we could do this summit was to go over our user survey results. As you might remember, we had this banner on our site asking us to take part in a survey. The results gave us a good idea of our community in regards to what language they use, what Brainz project they use more, how do they come to know about us, and so on.

Summit session in progress

Summit session in progress.


We got to know what you like, but more importantly what you don’t. We heard all of you, and we are on it. We will publish a detailed report on that soon.

You cannot be in Barcelona with such a good lot of people and not end up exploring the city. The team ended up cycling on the streets of Barcelona (many times on the wrong side), climbing up to the mosaic-y Park Güell, snacking on pinchos and tapas, visiting the Pompeu Fabra University (where our AcousticBrainz project resides) and taking their daily after-lunch strolls through the Arc de Triomf.

Apart from that, some of the record-breaking points from the summit would be:

  • We had nice colorful pillows with all our kids (we mean, Brainz projects) printed on them. And summit t-shirts too.
  • The summit was live streamed on our YouTube channel, for all those who couldn’t make it. That went pretty well, with only minor technical difficulties, and it provided a good overview (literally! 🙂 ). For those who missed it (or want to rewatch it), the archived streams are available on YouTube.
  • We finally decided to improve the user experience of our projects (more on the blog about that later).
  • We worked on a new wonderful Sound Team recording while having a terrace barbeque hosted by Elizabeth.
  • More gelato was eaten than ever before. (That shouldn’t be surprising.)

We’re wrapping up the summit with this blog, but we have all the memories preserved. Find the amazing moments captured by our in-house photographer Zas in his Facebook gallery, and those moments in motion in my own video here:

Until next year,
Cheers 😀

Server update, 2017-10-31

Boo! Release cycle was interrupted during the MetaBrainz Summit 17 and is now back to the usual period of two weeks. This release contains a lot of code refactoring, some admin tooling, and a few fixes. Optimizations were made to parts of the web service, particularly for JSON and browse requests. Anti-spam measures taken in July have been relaxed, as well as the period of time allowed for auto-editing newly added entities. The git tag is v-2017-10-31.

Bug

  • [MBS-9313] – Adding first release event should be an auto-edit
  • [MBS-9513] – User interface locales with country code are not working

Task

  • [MBS-9488] – Rename “limited user” to “new user”
  • [MBS-9519] – Hide biography, homepage, and collections description of limiter users from not-logged-in users

Improvement

  • [MBS-9496] – Modbot “ac being changed because of name change” edit note is confusing
  • [MBS-9505] – Extend time period to edit your own entries to 1 day
  • [MBS-9515] – Block adding Wikipedia relationships to anchors

Classical Clean Up #2: Mahler

It’s time for our second Classical Community Clean Up! Since our first clean up of Debussy was quite successful, we are back for another!

Haven’t heard about our new favorite task at hand? You can read about our first clean up on the forums here. Come join us in paying a little special attention to classical masters!

This time around the community has chosen the late Romantic composer Gustav Mahler (who was quite the conductor as well!). We encourage you during this time to not only help the community clean up Mahler’s metadata, but to learn more about Mahler as well.

The clean up events officially last one month (but can be continued until they’re complete!) and are meant to utilize our community’s power to clean up our classical metadata. If you are new to MusicBrainz, to classical editing, or both, we have a whole tool box and plenty of advice, tips and tricks to share. We advise you bookmark the tool box—it’s quite helpful! Our team of classical music enthusiasts will also provide plenty of support on our forums, so come join us!

What we will work on:

  • Reviewing the existing works to make sure there are no duplicates and the information looks correct, and add any missing works (keep in mind while it is perfectly ok to add lost works, it’d be good to specify they’re lost so that people don’t accidentally use them on recordings).
  • Check the release list for anything that doesn’t follow the classical guidelines. Not only that should be fixed, but that’s a good sign of the recording and relationship info being incomplete too.
  • Check the recording list. The only recordings that should be here by the end of the cleanup are of Mahler himself as a performer (probably mostly this piano roll album). Anything else being here should have performer relationships added to it if missing, then the artist credits for the recording should be changed to list the main performers (you can use the relevant script for that). Try to fix the whole release the recording is on, even if it’s not all by Mahler! But in the case of a very large compilation, it’s always acceptable to fix only the Mahler content on it.
  • Add missing Mahler recordings! If you have enough info to add a Mahler release we’re missing, that’s always useful. Just make sure to try to add as much info as possible from the get go, so we don’t have to clean that addition up as well 🙂

Don’t know where to begin? Join us and ask, let us help you find a jumping in point! Here to another great month of Classical Clean Up with Mahler!

Live streaming MB Summit 17

The MetaBrainz Summit 17 is slowly starting up, with everyone having arrived in Barcelona now, and people have already started discussing a bit in the corners of the MetaBrainz office. (As well as devouring a lot of chocolate!)

The summit officially starts tomorrow however (we’re aiming to begin at around 11 AM Barcelona time (CEST)), and while we’re having probably the most people at a summit ever, we recognise that a lot of people from the community are not able to be here for one reason or another, so we’re going to try something new tomorrow: live streaming the summit!

We’ll be live streaming on our YouTube account at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClC89t81khDKLCVs45prLqg/live – there will be a live chat as well, which I will try to monitor as best as I can. Keep in mind that this is a first for us, so sorry in advance for the technical difficulties we will almost certainly encounter. 🙂