Author Archives: ruaok

GDPR compliance

The General Data Protection Regulation is a complex EU regulation that stipulates many points for protecting private data of users on the Internet. Even though this is an EU regulation, it has a worldwide impact due to the nature of the Internet. This regulation comes into effect today, May 25, 2018 and is the reason why so many companies have sent you mail in the past few weeks about updating their privacy policies.

The MetaBrainz Foundation with its collection of projects is also affected by this regulation. We’ve been learning and adapting our sites to be compliant with the regulation – sadly this regulation isn’t entirely black and white and there is an incredible amount of room left for interpretation of these rules.

The good news is that this regulation is roughly in line with our established practices: We’ve always held private information in a high regard and applied the sort of rules to ourselves as we wish to have our own private data treated. Luckily, this makes our compliance effort considerably easier. We’ve made two significant changes to how we treat your data and also adopted terminology as used in the GDPR in order to use the same languages that many other sites are now adopting. Please keep reading to find out the exact details of what we are doing to comply.

However, we do ask for your compassion and help in our process of complying with the GDPR. As we already mentioned, the GDPR is a complex set of rules that are not fully clarified yet. We’ve taken action on the steps that are clear to us and we’re following ongoing conversations on points that are in gray zones or unclear to us. We’ve made our best initial effort on compliance and promise to keep working on it as the picture becomes more clear. If you believe that we could improve our compliance, please contact us and let us know what we can do to improve. It would also help us if you could provide concrete discussion or examples to help us understand and take action on your suggestion.

Finally, below is the link to our GDPR compliance statement, implementing the regulations as we understand them and how they affect your data in our ecosystem. Where possible, we provide links for deeper understanding, links for you to examine our relevant code and links to tickets to follow the process of improving our compliance.

MetaBrainz’ GDPR Compliance Statement

 

ListenBrainz release 18 March 2018

We received so few bug reports on the beta release of the ListenBrainz web site, that we decided to push those changes live and start working on new features. This release is substantially unchanged from our beta release.

The user facing changes that were released include:

  • Statistic infrastructure: We’ve created an infrastructure for creating graphs of user’s listening behaviour. So far we’ve only got an all-time top-artists graph to illustrate our setup, but soon we will work to create more graphs. Currently graphs will be generated every Monday starting at 0:00 UTC, if you logged in into your LB account during the last 30 days. If you haven’t logged in recently, you can request the calculation of your stats from your profile page.
  • Automatic data dumps: Now the ListenBrainz data will be dumped and synced to our FTP site twice a month. Currently this is scheduled for the 1st and the 15th of every month. The dumps will start being generated at 04:00 UTC and then copied to our FTP site and it will take a number of hours for the data dumps to appear on the FTP sites. Our documentation details how this data dump can be consumed.
  • Documentation improvements: Quite a few documentation bits have been improved since our last release, including better documentation on the Last.fm compatible API that ListenBrainz exposes.
  • Static page improvements: We’ve done some rearranging of our static pages and navigation bar to reflect the latest changes, including updating the data page and our roadmap page.
  • Listen count on home page: The home page now shows the current listen count.

We also made some internal/hosting changes that you can read about in our beta release blog post. The release from Friday has been tagged with v-2018-03-18.

Thanks to all those people who helped us put the beta site through its paces.

Our next major challenge: Fixing the MusicBrainz site design for an improved user experience

Back in 1998 when I started playing with Perl and wrote the CD Index (the pre-cursor to MusicBrainz). I was learning web development and had little understanding of web design. The tools I was using were primitive at the time and the results were cringeworthy and have not withstood the test of time.

Fast forward some 18 years and we’ve arrived at the current MusicBrainz site design — there have been minor facelifts over time and a bigger one once we released NGS back in 2011. But really, the site design hasn’t changed much and we’ve kept gluing features and new bits of data onto the crappy design, leaving us with the current mess of a UX experience we know as the modern MusicBrainz.

Our community has been asking us to improve UX for a long time — we need to:
Empower our community with better tools for developing, editing, viewing the magnificent data that we have.
Build a stronger foundation for further development, interaction, and extension of our projects in future
Make our projects more welcoming to newcomers, by lowering the learning curve as well as keeps the workflow of an advanced editor intact.

Fortunately for us, Chhavi [a design student from IIT, India] has become an active contributor to the MetaBrainz projects. She has been studying our sites and how we work as a team and has volunteered to drive the process to fix the UI and the user experience issues on the MusicBrainz site. She has proposed a part of this work as her Google Summer of Code project.

Our overall goal as a team is to create a design system which will help the designers and developers stay in sync, give a more unified theme to our projects, and make it easier for new contributors to join our projects. This will also make it much easier for our developers to address your requests for features/bug fixes faster in the future.

We are not barging into your online lives and trying to make our sites pretty — instead, we are focusing on the real experiences you have with them. We held long detailed conversations during our last summit in Barcelona, where Chhavi was also present and discussed a lot of concerns that might be running in your head while you read this.  As part of this initiative, we have been interviewing a number of key members of our project to understand what we and our users really need from this revamp. We have also kept track of community discussions around this topic. From this we decided that our users fall into three broad categories:

  1. There are those who contribute to code and understand database tech.

  2. Experienced/advanced MusicBrainz editors who don’t understand database tech.

  3. New users, who feel hopelessly lost in the current scenario.

To make all this research/discussion/feedback available for everyone to go through, we have started a Jira issue type Design that tracks all the design related tickets of MusicBrainz. The most notable tickets that show mock-ups of future MusicBrainz pages include:

When you look at these pages, please keep in mind that we’re trying to clean up the clutter and to make things simple and clean. Easier to understand for an experienced editor or a new one. The data that we have should be presented in a way that makes sense. The data should present the gaps and holes that it presently has, for people to be able to improve the data gaps. Data should also be our binding link to exploit the full potential of the projects that we have, such as ListenBrainz or CritiqueBrainz.

We are not trying to fluff things up and make them look pretty. Prettiness might come with the simplicity that we are chasing. Having user flows that do not hamper the speed and makes our life easier, is our utmost goal.

That said, we are happy to receive feedback on the upcoming designs as well as the process– if you have any, please post your comments to the appropriate tickets in Jira that we linked above. We’re currently getting some pressing dev tasks out of the way before we start the actual implementation of the redesigned project. Once our team is ready to work on this, we will public more blog posts about how this project will unfold and how it will impact our users.

 

ListenBrainz winter 2018 beta testing

After many more months of hacking on core infrastructure and improving our codebase, we’re finally ready to have more people come and help us test the latest beta version of ListenBrainz. Also, we’ve recently reached a milestone of the 100th million listen in our database!

We’ve made a some internal changes to the project (that took quite a bit of effort):

  • Improve hosting setup that allows us to run both the production and beta version of the site at the same time. This means that any data submitted to the beta site will be submitted to the master listens database and will be available in the BigQuery data set as well. We are mimicking the setup that MusicBrainz has — the beta site use a live database so that testing the service can work with live data.
  • Improve internal container setup to allow for both dumping the listen data and private data for complete backups.
  • Improve the speed with which we process incoming listens.

These internal changes will allows us to move to more frequent updates of ListenBrainz in the future! More important are the changes to the site that are user visible:

  • Statistic infrastructure: We’ve created an infrastructure for creating graphs of user’s listening behaviour. So far we’ve only got an all-time top-artists graph to illustrate our setup, but soon we will work to create more graphs. Currently graphs will be generated every Monday starting at 0:00 UTC, if you logged in into your LB account during the last 30 days. If you haven’t logged in recently, you can request the calculation of your stats from your profile page.
  • Automatic data dumps: Now the ListenBrainz data will be dumped and synced to our FTP site twice a month. Currently this is scheduled for the 1st and the 15th of every month. The dumps will start being generated at 04:00 UTC and then copied to our FTP site and it will take a number of hours for the data dumps to appear on the FTP sites. Our documentation details how this data dump can be consumed.
  • Documentation improvements: Quite a few documentation bits have been improved since our last release, including better documentation on the Last.fm compatible API that ListenBrainz exposes.
  • Static page improvements: We’ve done some rearranging of our static pages and navigation bar to reflect the latest changes, including updating the data page and our roadmap page.
  • Listen count on home page: The home page now shows the current listen count.

If you’re interested in helping us test, please use the beta site and test everything you can see. See if anything misbehaves and if you do spot any problems, please report them to our bug tracker! Hopefully we can push this live next week.

NB: The beta site is connected to the live database, so any listens you submit to it, will be part of your official ListenBrainz listen history!

No Spring 2018 schema change

We recently decided not to have a spring 2018 schema change release. As usual, we still have some bits left over to finish up from the last spring schema change. More importantly, we’re making a concerted effort to improve the user experience (UX) of the MusicBrainz site — more on that in a blog post later.

We may decide to do an autumn 2018 schema change, but this depends on how well our UX efforts progress over the course of winter and spring.

Web Service ver 1.0 (ws/1) will be removed in 6 months!

With the release of the Next Generation Schema in May of 2011 we officially deprecated the use of version 1 of our XML API. Now, 6 years later, we feel that we can finally pull the plug on this version of the API — it receives less than 1% of our Web Service traffic.

On the first release after 1 August 2018 we’re going to remove the Web Service version 1 (ws/1 API endpoint) support. If you are one of the few authors of software that has not updated your software to use the newer ws/2 endpoint, your software’s MusicBrainz functionality will cease to work after 1 August.

We think more than 6 years is enough time for people to upgrade their tools. 🙂

 

 

New MusicBrainz virtual machine released

I have recently released a new MusicBrainz virtual machine. This virtual machine includes all the important bits of MusicBrainz so you can run your own copy! I’d been hoping for feedback if people have encountered any problems with this VM, but I’ve not received any feedback. Here is to hoping that no news is good news!

For information on how to download, install and access this new virtual machine, take a look at our MusicBrainz Server setup page. The new VM can be downloaded from here via direct download or a torrent download.

Most of the outstanding bugs should be fixed in this release — if not, please open a new ticket.